Join | Print Page | Contact Us | Report Abuse | Sign In
Connections
Blog Home All Blogs
Quarterly or monthly local chapter meetings / recruitment outings; MOBB United connections; MOBB United Business Directory; special interest groups (e.g., special needs); driven by Chapter Development and Health and Wellness committees with support from Education and Engagement and Eco Dev committees for the directories; quarterly or monthly local chapter meetings/recruitment outings.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: volunteer  support  black  committee  meetup  MOBB United  shout out  son  Black son  incarcerated  local  NY  Prison  Woke Mom  Alexander  Chapter  children  connections  Education  funeral  jail  Kimberley  memorial  Overview  poetry  Summer  Vanessa  Advocacy  African-American  Alycia 

Gifted Learners: Advocating for Screening and Referrals for Children of Color

Posted By Tiffany A. Bargeman, Friday, April 20, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, March 27, 2018

By Kara Higgins

Kara Higgins     My son, Ezekiel, is never without a book in hand and a backpack full of reading on-the-go. As the youngest of five, he probably got read aloud to a little longer and a little more often than his siblings, with me not quite ready to let go of that sweet stage of snuggles and bedtime stories. So, it was no surprise when he was reading early and often. His descriptive storytelling, broad interests, and vast vocabulary are encouraging and impressive.

     Yet my avid reader is not in the talented and gifted program at his school, and he has never been screened. English is his second language, and he despises numbers (like his mama!). However, as a 4th grader, he reads at a 9th grade level, and his standardized test scores are well above average. Although I should know, I did not realize until recently that children across all state lines undergo IQ tests and gifted screenings at the teacher or parent request.  Shame on me! 

     Our student population nationwide has become increasingly diverse. However, African-American students are ⅓ less likely to be enrolled in any talented or gifted program in public or private sectors. There is an overrepresentation of White and Asian students in gifted and talented programs, while Black and Hispanic students are typically underrepresented. However, research does not support the notion that any one group is more intelligent than another (Renzulli, 2004). So how does this make sense?

     Students from underserved populations, of all races, may not exhibit characteristics that are stereotypically “gifted”. Some gifted individuals with exceptional aptitude may not demonstrate outstanding levels of achievement due to environmental circumstances, such as limited opportunities to learn as a result of poverty, discrimination, or cultural barriers. Other obstacles include physical barriers, emotional challenges or behaviors resulting directly from outside stressors. Hence, school faculty and administrators may overlook the child's aptitude and high ability learning because of these other factors.  Moreover, with ample evidence that our Black sons are often over-targeted as disciplinary problems from a very young age, it’s easy to assume that their gifts are therefore being overlooked.

     Brown vs the Board of Education was a step in formally attempting, as a nation, to achieve educational equality. The reality is still quite different; and we all know equality does not always equate with quality. No Child Left Behind (NCLB), a Congressional Act of 2001 that attempted to keep lower level learners from falling through the cracks, is a good example of equality, but not quality, impacting the children who are exceptional learners. Since NCLB, many teachers are forced to more or less ignore gifted children, instead teaching to a one-size-fits-all curriculum that caters to the lowest common denominator—the average classroom student—with the thought being that our gifted students don't need the extra work or attention. We as moms all know very well that the ignored or forgotten child often resorts to behavior and actions that will draw attention, whether good or bad.

     What can be done? Like anything else, knowing is half the battle. Be an advocate for our Black sons and for all kids who are more likely to get missed. Know that you can request for your son to be screened. Show up to all the parent-teacher conferences, no matter how much your son may be excelling. Bring this up in conversations with other parents and ask your child's teacher if she knows the statistics.

     Following are a few resources for further empowerment:

  • Supporting Emotional Needs for the Gifted: Provides resources and support for families and students.
  • Acceleration Institute: Dedicated to research and curriculum that supports gifted students.
  • Parenting Gifted Kids: This blog is written by a fellow mom and covers information for several ages and stages of childhood.
  • Unfortunately, a literature review revealed very little specific support or information for families or children of color. The National Association of Gifted Learners does have a web series written by a black student, regarding advocacy and experiences in academics. Check out this great blog post.

     For more resources, contact our Education and Engagement Committee Lead, Kumari Ghafoor-Davis, at education@mobbunited.org.

Download File (PDF)

Tags:  Advocating  African-American  Black  Children  Color  education  Gifted  Higgins  Kara  Learners  Referral  school  Screening 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Education and Engagement Committee Update

Posted By Tiffany A. Bargeman, Friday, April 20, 2018
Updated: Monday, April 9, 2018

By Kumari Ghafoor-Davis, MSW

     Hello, Moms of Black Boys United beauties! Happy April! Spring is finally here.

     CrownOur Education and Engagement Committee has been working towards keeping moms engaged through our monthly Facebook live readings and our MOBB United Book Club posts:

  • January’s live reading was with Derrick Barnes and his illustrated book, Crown, about the feeling a young boy gets from his trip to the barbershop for a fresh haircut.
  • February’s live reading was with Javaka Steptoe and his book, Radiant Child, a beautifully illustrated story on the life of young artist, Jean-Michel Basquiat (additional info).
  • March’s live reading was with Dr. Irene Okoronkwo-Obika and her book, Chisom the Champ Meets the World, which teaches children that self love is key to overcoming bullies and interpersonal obstacles.
  •  On April 22 at 7 p.m., we'll host our next Facebook live reading with Corey Richardson and his ebook, We Used to Have Money, Now We Have You: A Dad’s Bedtime Story. This story from a dad’s perspective uses wit and pragmatism to remind children that a parent’s love is infinite, but patience and finances are not.

Between the World and Me     MOBB United Book Club’s latest selection, Between The World and Me, by Ta-Nehisi Coates, has generated great discussions over the past few months (January 6, January 15, January 23, March 5). The Book Club’s posts sparked conversations around how our boys’ black bodies are viewed through the lenses of others; how race is the child of racism and not the father; and how being “White” is a made-up social construct. We hope that you will stay tuned for our next book, which we will announce soon. Please feel free to comment on the posts from this fascinating book described as a “letter from a father to his son”. You can search for posts using the hashtag, #mobbunitedbookclub.

     MOBB United also has partnered with the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE) to offer workshops, conferences, and/or forums with lawmakers, parents, and their children in cities across the country. Retired and active duty Black law enforcement officers will talk with participants about how we can work together to keep our communities safe and how law enforcement can become more involved in keeping our children alive in their jurisdictions. They have connections to police chiefs and those in command all over the country, so please join us in this fight to keep our sons safe. We are really excited to get these workshops scheduled between April and June of this year and we need your help to get these informative interactive forums scheduled.

     Looking for a great way to reward your son for a fantastic school year? Give him the gift of inspiration by sending him to the “From the Fire” Leadership Academy. If you are interested in hosting a forum or workshop in your city, please connect with me at education@mobbunited.org or mobbconnections@mobbunited.org.

     Have an awesome month!

FaceBook Re-Post

*The aforementioned book club posts were shared originally in the Moms of Black Boys United, Inc. private Facebook group,
and Education and Engagement Committee Lead Kumari Ghafoor-Davis gave us permission to share them.
If you are a mom of a Black son and member of that group, you can read and/or respond in the comments by clicking the links.

Download File (PDF)

Tags:  Advocacy  advocate  Barnes  book  Chisom  club  Coates  Corey  Derrick  education  engagement  Ghafoor-Davis  Irene  javaka  Kumari  learn  National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Exe  NOBLE  Okoronkwo-Obika  radiant child  read  reading  Richardson  steptoe  study  Ta-Nehisi  teach 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Education and Engagement Committee Update

Posted By Tiffany A. Bargeman, Saturday, February 10, 2018
Updated: Saturday, February 10, 2018

By Kumari Ghafoor-Davis

Education and Engagement     Happy February, beauties! The Education and Engagement Committee has started reading another book, Between The World and Me, by Ta-Nehisi Coates. We have had three posts so far this month. If you haven’t already, hopefully you will begin reading the book with us and join in the discussion on Facebook by searching #mobbunitedbookclub on your MOBB United Facebook group search bar.    

     We will also be holding another Facebook Live reading that will take place on February 25th at 7pm with the author of Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, by Javaka Steptoe. Jean-Michel Basquiat and his unique, collage-style paintings rocketed to fame in the 1980s as a cultural phenomenon unlike anything the art world had ever seen. But before that, he was a little boy who saw art everywhere: in poetry books and museums, in games, in the words that we speak, and in the pulsing energy of New York City. Award-winning illustrator Javaka Steptoe’s vivid text and bold artwork that echoes Basquiat’s own, introduce young readers to the powerful message that art doesn’t always have to be neat or clean—and definitely not inside the lines—to be beautiful. We will have giveaways for the first ladies who log on to the live reading that evening. This will be the second Facebook Live reading; our first live reading was in December from Derrick Barnes, the author of Crown.

Between the World and Me, by Ta-Nehisi Coates
Between The World and Me, by Ta-Nehisi Coates

pink arrow

 Facebook Re-Post
*The following posts were shared originally in the Moms of Black Boys United, Inc. private Facebook group, and Education and Engagement Committee Lead Kumari Ghafoor-Davis gave us permission to share it publicly. If you are a mom of a Black son and member of that group, you can read and/or respond in the comments by clicking the linked dates.


January 6, 2017
“Happy New Year, Beauties! It's that time again for another book club read!!
We are so excited about our choice for the next MOBB United book club read, Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me. We will begin reading on January 8th and will post our first question about the book on January 15th.
Coates is a national correspondent for The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. He is the author of The Beautiful Struggle, Between the World and Me, and the new book We Were Eight Years in Power.
In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation's history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of "race," a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men—bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion.
Between the World and Me is Coates' attempt to address these questions and concerns in a letter to his adolescent son.
Coates has been hailed by Toni Morrison as "required reading”, a bold and personal literary exploration of America's racial history by "the single best writer on the subject of race in the United States" (The New York Observer).
Order your copy of Between the World and Me today, so we can start discussing this awesome book together.
Thank you ladies.
MOBB United Book Club”

pink arrow

January 23, 2017
“Welcome to the second post for our current #mobbunitedbookclub choice, Between the World and Me, by TaNehisi Coates. One question that comes up for me as I read is, if so many people feel that the reality of race is a natural fact and inevitably leads to racism, how can we begin to heal this misconception within our own communities where we also have racism and hatred among and for ourselves? Please share your thoughts and your own questions with us in comments below.”

Download File (PDF)

Tags:  art  award  BarnesCrown  Basquiat  Between the World and Me  book club  Coates  Davis  Derrick  Education  Engagement  Ghafoor  Ghafoor-Davis  illustrator  Javaka  Jean  Jean-Michel  Kumari  Kumari Ghafoor-Davis  Michel  museum  NY  painting  Radiant Child  Steptoe  Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat  Ta-Nehisi 

PermalinkComments (0)
 
Moms of Black Boys United - Ensuring that our SUNs Survive and Thrive
 
Follow Us:
Our mission

M.O.B.B. United aims to provide information and support for moms of Black sons while promoting positive images of Black boys and men. Our goal is to influence policy impacting how Black boys and men are treated by law enforcement and society.

Contact Us:
1825 Park Avenue
Ste. 1102
New York, NY 10035
1-877-91-MOBBU
Media@MOBBUNITED.ORG
 

All rights reserved. Moms of Black Boys United for Social Change, Inc